A Look at the Future OF the DACA Program

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a program that has cushioned undocumented youth immigrants against deportation. Through this initiative, eligible youth immigrants can acquire work permits, which allow them to work in the United States. Besides the group of people targeted by the DACA program benefits from in-state-tuition fees and are free to acquire driving licenses. Beneficiaries of the DACA program are expected to renew their membership after every two years.

 

The DACA program has brought numerous benefits to the United States. A huge number of the beneficiaries of the program either study or work in the US. This has greatly benefited universities and colleges across the country. The access to education by young immigrants enables them to secure high paying jobs, and this means that they will pay more tax. Equally, they are able to invest and create businesses in various sectors of the economy.

 

The DACA program has been in existence for over five years, and charitable organizations such as Frontera Fund have shown overwhelming support for the program. Frontera Fund is on the frontline in protecting the existence of the program that is on the verge of collapsing due to constant attacks from new administrators.

 

In the recent past, the DACA program has been at the receiving end of constant attacks orchestrated by members of the GOP. These attacks have sent shockwaves to organizations and networks fighting for the rights of young immigrants. These agencies serve an instrumental purpose in providing young immigrants with guidance, information and assistance. They also agitate for permanent solutions that will sufficiently address the plight of undocumented youth immigrants.

 

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, one governor and other nine attorneys generals are among the people who have openly expressed their desire for the termination of the DACA program. The legal experts penned a letter to the Trump administration, threatening to seek court action if the program was not revoked before 5th September. According to this legal team, the program should not be brought to a grinding halt at once; it has to be phased out gradually. This can be achieved through ignoring new applications and stopping the processing of renewal requests.

 

The urge surge in the number of legal cases pushing for the termination of the program prompted the members of the Hispanic Caucus to convene a meeting with the Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly so as to get a clear understanding on the future of the program. Unfortunately, Kelly confirmed their worst fears that the program that benefits over 800,000 people is nearly collapsing.